<html dir="ltr"><head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"></head><body style="text-align:left; direction:ltr;"><div>Hi, Vivek,</div><div><br></div><div>The first thing to try might be to reduce the dgwdsp decay to something less than .25, since you might be dealing with a phase transition (a model such that a small change in parameter value causeing a huge change in network structure).</div><div><br></div><blockquote type="cite" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex; border-left:2px #729fcf solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div><b>Questions</b>:</div><div>1. In particular: how should I interpret the log output that output  Estimating Function Values. For a model that is going to converge do these values get close to 0?</div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Yes. At the MLE the expected network statistics equal to the observed, and so their difference as a function of the parameters is called an <i>estimating function</i>. Of course, when we use MCMC, we have to approximate this by taking the sample means of the simulated statistics and subtracting off the observed.</div><div><br></div><blockquote type="cite" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex; border-left:2px #729fcf solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div>2. What are the scaling limits of STERGMS? How many nodes/edges per time point can they handle gracefully? Also is there a scalability limit on number of timepoints?</div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Underneath it all, STERGM CMLE just calls ergm() with a specially formulated specification. So, STERGM CMLE will scale about as well as ergm itself.</div><div><br></div><blockquote type="cite" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex; border-left:2px #729fcf solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div>3. In general, what diagnostics in the output log attached can I look at to get a sense of why my model is not converging?</div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>That the estimating function values are fluctuating like this suggests that you might have a phase transition, hence my advice above.</div><div><br></div><div>If some of these statistics were going off to infinity, you would have a diagnostic of multicollinearity or related problems. (The current master branch on GitHub, if you feel up to installing it, tries to diagnose those problems before the estimation.)</div><div><br></div><div>You can use the MCMC.runtime.traceplot= control parameter to have it make traceplots of MCMC runs to check for insufficient burn-in or a phase transition.</div><div><br></div><div>                                 I hope this helps,</div><div>                                       Pavel</div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><blockquote type="cite" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex; border-left:2px #729fcf solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div><br></div><div>I would greatly appreciate any suggestions.</div><div><br></div><div>Best,</div><div>Vivek.</div><div> </div></div>
<pre>_______________________________________________</pre><pre>statnet_help mailing list</pre><a href="mailto:statnet_help@u.washington.edu"><pre>statnet_help@u.washington.edu</pre></a><pre><br></pre><a href="http://mailman13.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/statnet_help"><pre>http://mailman13.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/statnet_help</pre></a><pre><br></pre></blockquote></body></html>